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Detroit

Tom PetersVie, 18/07/2014 - 16:36

Did you see the recent article, “The Post-Post-Apocolyptic Detroit”? Before I met Tom Peters, I lived in Detroit. My husband had an idyllic, cookie-cutter suburban ’60s upbringing there with a family full of auto workers. All his grandparents were immigrants, happy to see their children thrive in post-WWII Detroit. He spent the ’80s in downtown […]

The post Detroit appeared first on Tom Peters.

Illusions of grandeur

the economistJue, 17/07/2014 - 06:01

“WE have never been a nation of haves and have-nots,” observed Marco Rubio back in 2011. “We are a nation of haves and soon-to-haves, of people who have made it and people who will make it.” For Mr Rubio, a Florida senator and possible Republican presidential contender in 2016, “the fundamental principle of America’s prosperity” is that “anyone from anywhere can accomplish anything...if you're willing to work hard, play by the rules and have the ability to do it.” Mr Rubio recently offered his own rags-to-Republican story as proof the American Dream is alive and well: “I was privileged to be born in a land of equal opportunity,” he said, “the one place on earth where the son of a bartender and a maid could achieve the same things as a son of a president or a millionaire.”

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“Mastery”Total Real Estate TrainingAnnual Education ConferenceSydney, 15-16 July 2014

Tom PetersMié, 16/07/2014 - 03:09

Tom is addressing a group of the most successful realtors in Australia and New Zealand. He and Rupert Murdoch are the principal keynoters. (Mr. Murdoch is in town to, among other things, celebrate the 50th anniversary—15 July—of the launch of his national newspaper, the Australian.) “The pattern is one I’m familiar with,” Tom says of […]

The post “Mastery”
Total Real Estate Training
Annual Education Conference
Sydney, 15-16 July 2014
appeared first on Tom Peters.

Playing one last card

the economistMar, 15/07/2014 - 18:32

THE CARDS have been stacked against Atlantic City for years. This resort city in New Jersey lost its casino monopoly in the region when neighbouring states began legalising gambling a decade ago. Gaming revenues have been steadily falling ever since. In 2012 Pennsylvania, which opened its first casino in 2006, edged out Atlantic City to become the nation’s second-largest gambling market. New Jersey no longer holds all the aces.

The casino industry is the city’s biggest employer, and roughly a quarter of all jobs are now in jeopardy. Four of Atlantic City’s dozen casinos have already announced plans to close their doors. The Atlantic shuttered in January, leaving about 1,600 people jobless. The 2,100 employees at Showboat Casino on the iconic boardwalk may lose their jobs by the end of the summer, as could the 3,100 workers at Revel, which just entered its second bankruptcy. The latest stroke of bad luck came on Friday when Trump Plaza’s owners announced it may shut its doors in September. Notices went out to its 1,000 employees yesterday.

The city’s leaders have decided to shuffle the deck. In a press briefing on...Continue reading

They really love us

the economistMar, 15/07/2014 - 01:06

VOTERS, journalists and just about everyone paying some attention to politics all tend to over-estimate the power of the president. When Barack Obama swept into office in 2008, Americans were dazzled by his promises of change at home and a more judicious mix of strength and humility abroad. Indeed, it was hoped the president would rescue America’s image after eight years of George Bush's brand of ham-fisted, cowboy-booted diplomacy. But many worry President Obama has also managed to tarnish the country’s brand, either through too little intervention, which has made America look weak (see Syria, Iraq and Ukraine), or through too much, which has made the country seem callous (the use of drones, phone-tapping and the like).

But for all of this anxiety about what the rest of the world thinks, it seems America's star has not quite fallen, at  least according to the Continue reading

Prayers and pistols

the economistVie, 11/07/2014 - 19:43

“O RIGHTEOUS God, who searches minds and hearts, bring to an end the violence of the wicked and make the righteous secure,” requests Psalm 7:9. Alas, God alone cannot be expected to ensure righteous folk are safe from violence. In the office of Keith McBrayer, the sheriff of Henry Country in Georgia, assembled church leaders yesterday were also asked to do their bit.

The Georgia Safe Carry Protection Act came into effect on July 1st. This means Georgians with certain licenses can now carry their guns to a whole host of new places: bars, parts of airports, some government buildings, schools (with special permission) and even churches. But the law is “vague”, according to Sheriff McBrayer. Many are confused over who is, and who is not, allowed to bring their weapons to church. And some, such as your correspondent, are moved to ask why a magnum might be welcome in church at all.

Faith-based organisations across the country are Continue reading

What are the costs of gun ownership?

the economistJue, 10/07/2014 - 22:31

I WASN'T sure what to expect from the Porcupine Freedom Festival, but I was delighted by what I found. At this annual gathering of libertarians, anarchists and jovial “freedom-lovers”, the conversations were thoughtful, the atmosphere festive and the bonhomie infectious. Sure, there was plenty of hyperbole about the “inevitable collapse of the state” (in the words of Jeffrey Tucker, Chief Liberty Office of Liberty.me). But I also met plenty of people running for local office with some good ideas for removing silly regulations and reducing official corruption. Many of these revellers have already pledged to move to New Hampshire in the hopes of making it the “most free” state in the union. “To have so many extremely thoughtful people moving to our state is really positive,” observed Jim Rubens, a New Hampshire Republican who was busily shaking hands and...Continue reading

Once more unto the breaches

the economistJue, 10/07/2014 - 07:29

AMERICA’s Congress has been struggling for years to come up with legislation to address cyber-security issues, without success. Now it is trying yet again. On July 8th a draft bill, known as the Cyber Information Sharing Act, or CISA, cleared the Senate’s intelligence committee and will now be debated by the full chamber. The proposed legislation is likely to face stiff opposition from privacy groups, who have already given warning about some of its provisions.

We have been here before. In 2012 another cyber-security bill, the Cyber Information Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA), was heavily promoted by its supporters, but ended up being stymied because of concerns that it did not do enough to protect people’s privacy. Since then, Edward Snowden’s revelations about the mass surveillance activities of the National Security Agency (NSA) have made folk even warier of anything that could result in more information ending up in the hands of government.

That is why CISA faces an uphill struggle. The bill has provisions that would, among other things, encourage the government to share more classified information about cyber-threats with...Continue reading

Common ground

the economistMié, 09/07/2014 - 19:03

CORY BOOKER and Rand Paul hardly seem like natural bedfellows. Mr Booker, the former mayor of Newark and now a junior senator from New Jersey, has devoted himself to finding big-government solutions to seemingly intractable problems such as urban blight and poor schools; Mr Paul, a Republican senator from Kentucky, seems fairly certain that the government is at the root of most problems. Yet the two men share a disgust for America’s prison system, which locks up too many people for too many things, trapping millions of Americans in a cycle of poverty and incarceration.   

“Our criminal justice system is broken,” said Mr Booker this week. This is an understatement. America is home to 5% of the world’s population, but 25% of the world’s prisoners. More than 2m Americans are locked up at any given time, more than half of them in state prisons. This is costly, at $29,000 per federal inmate per year and more for state prisoners—about the price of sending each one to an Ivy...Continue reading

The pepper-mill principle

the economistLun, 07/07/2014 - 16:50

ROSS DOUTHAT thinks liberals should object less strenuously to the Hobby Lobby decision because religion often impels corporations to do things that liberals would consider morally praiseworthy. He points out that Hobby Lobby, a chain of craft shops, was itself lauded by the left-wing website Demos last year for paying its employees excellent wages and donating to charities, and that this sense of ethical responsibility flows from the Christian convictions of its owners.

Mr Douthat's argument is a mess. Liberals do not object to Hobby Lobby paying its employees higher-than-average wages out of a sense of Christian responsibility; they object to it trying to dictate the sexual and reproductive choices of its employees, whether out of a sense of Christian responsibility or not. They...Continue reading

Excellence. NO EXCUSES! Update

Tom PetersLun, 07/07/2014 - 02:58

Tom has continued to tinker with his now super-sized document, Excellence. NO EXCUSES! He asked the opinion of his Twitter followers, and they approved the addition of “Moral Bedrock of Management,” available here. It is now item number 6 in this latest version of Excellence. NO EXCUSES! We encourage you to download it, or one […]

The post Excellence. NO EXCUSES! Update appeared first on Tom Peters.

Don't blame Justice Ginsburg

the economistVie, 04/07/2014 - 19:53

SO MUCH for the Supreme Court’s summer recess. Not 72 hours after they wrapped things up for the year, the justices had an emergency application to contend with. The plea came from Wheaton College, a Christian institution in Illinois. As a religious non-profit, Wheaton is one of the organisations with objections to paying for their employees’ contraceptives the Obama administration tried to accommodate a year ago with this compromise: fill out a form self-certifying to your objection, and you do not have to pay for the birth control. The third-party insurance company will provide the birth control at no cost. Wheaton, like dozens of other evangelical organisations, finds this alternative arrangement unacceptable because filling out the form “triggers” the delivery of contraceptives.

Yesterday, by a vote of 6-3, the justices gave Wheaton a temporary exemption from the accommodation. It need not fill out the form, pending resolution of its legal claim in court.

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Period piece

the economistVie, 04/07/2014 - 18:31

EVERYTHING in America has gotten bigger since 1776 but the sentences. Were Thomas Jefferson writing today, the baggy monsters with which he opens the Declaration of Independence would be hacked to bits by editors and spin doctors mindful of the need for quick sound bites. As tortuous as we think the Declaration's opening sentences are, though, one of them may have been even longer in the original, reports Jennifer Schuessler in the New York Times. Danielle Allen, a professor at Princeton's Institute for Advanced Study, believes she has found a mistake in the current standard transcription of the Declaration: the period after "Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness" was actually a comma.

The clause that follows the disputed punctuation states "that to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed." Ms Allen argues that by splitting the thought into two sentences, the period changes the meaning:

"The logic of...Continue reading

Negative externalities

the economistJue, 03/07/2014 - 04:26

BACK in the 1980s the most annoying thing about walking into a guitar store was the certainty that some long-haired guy would be sitting in the back with a Stratocaster playing "Eruption". These days the most annoying thing about attending any tech, trade or "ideas" conference is the certainty that some short-haired individual will be strutting around a stage yammering about disruption. Entrepreneurs, business journalists and tech gurus have spent the past decade-plus claiming that whatever new gimmick they wanted people to read about or invest in constitutes a "disruptive technology"—by which they mean they have discovered something that will force existing businesses to radically rethink their very existence. Last month Jill Lepore, a professor of American history at Harvard, finally declared war on the term. In an article in the New Yorker she attacked the research and thinking behind the "The Innovator's Dilemma",...Continue reading

Disingenuous

the economistMié, 02/07/2014 - 20:01

HOW broad is the ruling in Burwell v Hobby Lobby? To listen to Justice Samuel Alito, author of the majority opinion, letting some religious employers off the hook for providing no-cost birth control to their employees is quite modest. The decision applies only to “closely-held” corporations, he wrote, and it is “concerned solely with the contraceptive mandate”:

Our decision should not be understood to hold that an insurance-coverage mandate must necessarily fall if it conflicts with an employer’s religious beliefs. Other coverage requirements, such as immunizations, may be supported by different interests (for example, the need to combat the spread of infectious diseases) and may involve different arguments about the least restrictive means of providing them.

Justice Alito is a smart guy, so the weak and disingenuous arguments he strings together in this section of his opinion are...Continue reading

This time he's really mad

the economistMié, 02/07/2014 - 05:13

LAST November, as Barack Obama was delivering one of many speeches on immigration reform, a heckler shouted that the president "had the power to stop deportations for all." "Actually, I don't," replied a peeved Mr Obama, adding that he was obliged to follow the law of the land. But yesterday the president who has presided over more deportations than any other offered the biggest hint yet that just maybe, yes, he can.

In an 11-minute speech delivered outside the White House, Mr Obama acknowledged what has been clear to congressional observers for some time: that the prospects of the Republican-led House of Representatives passing an immigration-reform bill this year have dwindled to zero. Mr Obama chastised the Republicans for failing to take any sort of action on immigration a year after a bipartisan group of senators Continue reading

No dues is good dues

the economistLun, 30/06/2014 - 22:25

WHO counts as a state employee? One of the most important Supreme Court cases this year turned on the answer to this deceptively simple question. Pamela Harris, a mother in Illinois, says she is not a state employee. The state of Illinois insisted that she was. By five votes to four, the justices largely sided with Ms Harris. 

Ms Harris looks after her severely disabled son at home. The government pays her to do this, via Medicaid. Because Ms Harris and other home-health assistants accept a cheque from the government, Rod Blagojevich, a former governor of Illinois, decreed in 2003 that they were public employees, and that therefore they could unionise. In effect, this meant that they all had to pay fees to the SEIU, the labour union that represents such workers in Illinois.

Ms Harris and others objected, saying they would rather keep their money. In a case filed in 2010 against the state and Pat Quinn, the governor, they said that being forced to subsidise the union amounted to a “pernicious form of compelled expressive association” that violated their First Amendment rights.  

The state's argument...Continue reading

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